Tag Archives: Camino

From Rieti to Poggio Bustone

We had spent a very good night in Reiti since we had not slept for almost 24 hours. We woke up with lots of energy ready to go and begin our Camino of Saint Francis. We got directions on how to get out of the city and walked on a busy highway for three or four miles until we began our ascent into the mountains. We finally arrived at our destination, La Foresta, a small Franciscan monastery.

Beautiful landscape on our walk.

Stunningly beautiful landscape. We were confident at this point only later we got discouraged as we lost the path.

A station approaching the monastery.

With signs we still got lost.

The cloister was closed but the church was opened so we stay for prayer.

Lovely image of Mary.

The chapel where we prayed.

The door to the cloister at Foresta.

With confidence we begin our ascent into the woods convinced we were on the Camino.

Fresh water to revive our spirits now that we thought we had found our way.

Now we knew this was the path.

The path became narrow and and very precarious. John fell and broke his walking stick so we decided we took the wrong turn and went back to another path and walked for a long time ending up on an asphalt road and we realized we weren’t on the Camino at all. So we returned to the monastery where we encountered two Italians who put us on the right path and we began to see signs but soon the path became more rugged and ended in a farm. We were losing confidence because we thought we made another mistake so we went back to the monastery. It was now about 3 o’clock and we had been working since 8 in the morning. We had walked in the woods for a long time and basically walked big circles. We had lost our Italian guidebook. We meet an American who started in Gubbio and said the stretch we were walking to Assisi was poorly marked and people were prone to getting lost. The good news was that the monastery was now open we had the opportunity to see another cave where Saint Francis slept.

It was past 3 o’clock and there was no way we could make it to Poggio Bustone before nightfall so we had to hitch a ride and got there in time for dinner. The hotel we were scheduled to stay in had been closed because of earthquake damage but the manager found us a B and B. We had a great dinner and conversations with Italians with lively interchange.

Our room had a balcony which overlooked the valley below. The balcony door was opened and a little kitten wandered in who wanted a lot of attention. I found out the next morning his name was Meno.

This is a town that played a part in the life of Saint Francis, who visited the town one day, knocked on the door at the arched portal, declaring “Buon Giorno Buona Gente,” “Good morning, good people” and proceeded to proclaim to them the Gospel.

He took refuge in another cave up the side of the mountain at the church of Saint James. We intended to visit it the next day.

We hoped that we could find someone who could give us a map. The pilgrims we encountered said this stretch is almost impossible because of poor signage. The stretch from Gubbio to Assisi is about 4 to 5 days well marked with lots of pilgrims. We had chosen the road less travelled.

Early Morning in Poggio.

Saint James.

Door to church.

Gives an idea of the structure hugging the mountain.

The tau cross of Saint Francis.

The cave where Francis slept and instructed his disciples.

Saint Francis.

The church of Saint James.

The cloister.

The church.

Come Walk the Camino

For over 1000 years people have walked the Camino, the medieval pilgrimage known as the Way of Saint James. Saint Francis of Assisi, El Cid, Dante, are among those who have made the inspiring but grueling journey across northern Spain, concluding with a pilgrim liturgy at the Cathedral of Saint James de Compostela, where tradition has it that the remains of the saint are buried.

Wednesday, August 19 at 6:30 pm, Father Kauffmann and Sacred Heart parishioner Donna Looney, who have each made the Camino, will share their experiences along the way. See beautiful Spanish vistas and learn about traditions pilgrims have shared for a thousand years.

See also this clip from Rick Steves: https://youtu.be/_4mRnoZuiZU?t=2m2s

My Camino posts, collected here.

The Vineyards Across the Rhine

Today [December 23rd] was spent wandering in the vineyards across the Rhine from Bingen in Rudesheim. I took the boat over the river and began a steep ascent through the vineyards to the monument to Germany freedom built in the 19th century.

 

 

View of Bingen from Rudesheim

There is a commanding view of the Rhine valley from that vantage point.

The impressive monument was built to celebrate the reunification of Germany. From there I walked the the Neiderwald temple built in late 18th century. It was a favorite place for intellectuals like Goethe to gather and musicians like Brahms and Beethoven. This was also destroyed in the bombings but recently restored.
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More sights of Rudesheim are here.

Then a lengthy walk to the Abbey of Saint Hildegard that was built in 1904.

Bingen was on the Camino to Santiago!

Road sign pointing to the Abbey

 

The monastery vineyards

 

Road side shrine

Road side shrine

Next: the abbey.

St. James the Apostle – A Camino Reflection

Father Mattingly wrote the following Reflection.

Santiago is Spanish for St. James the Greater, apostle of Jesus and son of Zebedee. By tradition his remains are interred in the crypt of the cathedral at Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

There are three images of St. James on the camino and, indeed, in all of Spain: St. James as apostle, as pilgrim and a Matamoros (or killer of the Moors). It is this last image that is more controversial and the image I want to address.

St. James as Matamoros is portrayed in images with Santiago on a horse wielding a sword. Most time on the ground around him, taking the force of the sword, are Moors (adherents to Islam). The image has become distasteful to some people not only because it portrays a saint being violent but because it would seem to project Muslims in a negative light. In the cathedral in Santiago flowers have been placed around the statue so that you can see St. James and his horse but not the Moors below him.

The objection to this image seems to me to be a misunderstanding of the context. The action portrayed of is not one of aggression but defense. St. James arises under this title at a time when the Moors were conquering Spain. The Moors came as warriors, putting the Christians to the sword and decimating the churches and the Christian culture of the Spaniards. It is said that in a battle when Christian troops were greatly outnumbered, a heavenly warrior on a white horse fought the Moorish soldiers leading the outnumbered Christians to a decisive victory that turned the tide and lead to the reclaiming of Spain.

I would suggest that there is value in reclaiming St. James if not as “Matamoros” as Defender of Christians. The recent events around the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), their threats to bring their terror to other countries as well as other extremist groups that arise – often focusing on Christians – suggests to me the need to revive the notion of St. James as our heavenly defender. In no way do I want to see a stance of aggressive violence toward Muslims, yet it may come to a point where Christians will have to defend ourselves from attack, from any source. This image proves that we have a right to defend ourselves from such aggression, indeed a duty. We also have a saint to which we can appeal.

Through the intercession of St. James, may Christians be protected from all forms of violence against us.

Santiago, defender of Christians… Pray for us.

Camino Day 31, Santiago… Last day

Day 31. Thursday, September 25, 2014.

Santiago… Last day.

When we got up this morning most of the pilgrims in the albergue were already gone. After breakfast we dropped our backpacks at the hotel where we would spend our last night and went to the cathedral where concelebrated the 10:30 am English Mass.

We were early and explored the cathedral. We had bought Saint James medals and wanted to touch them to the statue that pilgrims traditionally hug on their arrival, as a sign of reverence. We prayed at the tomb of the saint for the protection of Christians throughout the world, especially those suffering persecution.

The English Mass was more intimate than the pilgrims’ Mass we attended the last two days, but we packed the chapel that is reserved for the Mass. The priest, from England, who has volunteered three months to minister to English speaking pilgrims in Santiago. All in attendance were invited to tell people where they were from and if they had made the Camino. We were happy to see many pilgrims who had walked the Camino with us.

    

After Mass we had lunch at a parador restaurant, an elegant state run restaurant in a historic building. They offered a pilgrim menu which was by far the best we’ve had.

We checked in to our hotel which is humble but seems luxurious after sleeping in albergues for a month. We had no idea how we missed real sheets and towels! We rested and toured the cathedral museum and cathedral with an audio guide. It helped bring together the architectural development over the centuries of the cathedral from Romanesque to Gothic to Renaissance to baroque.

        

    

    

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We were able to see Romanesque statuary that had been discovered in the ongoing renovation, reliquaries and antique liturgical vessels, and rooms of tapestries. After the museum the tour continued to the cathedral from the perspective of a medieval pilgrim. It emphasized for us the design of the cathedral to receive pilgrims. We got a better sense of the theology which celebrated welcome, love, conversion and salvation.

On emerging from the cathedral we happened on an orchestra concert just beginning to start in one of the plazas. What a wonderful way to conclude our Camino!

     

This is our last entry from Spain, however we will continue to reflect on this adventure. It has meant a lot to share this Camino with you.

We’ll close with a blessing used at Mass today marking an end of a pilgrimage:

Father we ask your blessing on us,
Pilgrims who have come to venerate the tomb of your apostle Santiago.
As you kept us safe on our Camino way
May You keep us safe on our journey home.
And inspired by our experience hers
May we live out the values of the gospel
As our pilgrimage through life continues.
We ask Saint James to intercede for us
As we ask this in the name of Jesus Christ,
Your Son and our Redeemer, Amen.

Please pray for our safe journey home.

Camino Day 30, Santiago, Rest Day

Day 30. Wednesday, September 24, 2014. Santiago…Rest day.

We stayed in bed until about nine before packing up our backpacks and going out for coffee. Although we planned to stay in the same albergue we had to clear our things and recheck in after 1:00 pm. We are not thrilled with the albergue, but it is in a great location and we could not get a hotel room until tomorrow night.

We explored the area taking note of restaurants and shops. There were a number of churches that we visited. We also came upon a market which we enjoyed seeing. But the best was yet to come.

         

We went to the cathedral to concelebrate the pilgrims’ Mass at noon. There were 14 priests at the Mass and it was a great feeling to be welcomed and given vestments and be part of this great experience again, this time from the altar. When pilgrims arrive and “hug the saint” it is from a hallway behind the main altar. Throughout the mass arriving pilgrims were walking behind the main altar, visible only through a grill, and we could see their hands embracing the saint during the Mass. Father John and I were asked to distribute Holy Communion. We were moved by the devotion of so many people. About 1,000 people attend the pilgrims Mass each day. Again, the botafumeiro was used and we had a bird’s eye view as it swung through the transepts, but we had been told no cameras! It was great after Mass to see more familiar faces of pilgrims we had walked with along the way, some only arriving today.

   

Two Irish sisters from Galway have become good friends and we invited them to join us for lunch. We ate at an outdoor cafe and through lunch kept welcoming more friends from the Camino who happened by. The women recommended a bus tour that goes around the city, so we got a better idea of the city.

We also took a rooftop tour of the cathedral. It was exciting to climb the 100+ stairs to the roof. It was a beautiful day and we had incredible views from the roof, as you can see from photos in this post.

Father John, in the hat, taking in the rooftop view.

Father Mattingly and I ready to see the city of Santiago from the roof of the Cathedral.

 

      

 

 

    

   

The day passed quickly and after dinner we are about to go to bed. In the albergue light are out at 10:00 pm sharp.

We are happy to see our bodies already recovering after one day off the trail. Perhaps we will be fully recovered by the time we arrive home. If you are wondering about the beards you will have to wait and see this weekend!

Santiago at Last, Part 2

Day 29. September 23, 2014 (continued).

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After our last post we walked to Saint Francis Church to obtain our second Compostela. This is the 800th anniversary of Saint Francis of Assisi making the Compostela and special certificates are being issued. We are thrilled to receive one.

It was an incredible church with a beautiful reredos.

The adjoining convent has been developed into a four star hotel whose proceeds help support the Franciscans in their worldwide missions. It was impressive.

Our real objective this evening was to get to the cathedral to “hug the saint.” Mission accomplished. There is a staircase behind the main altar which leads to the bust of Saint James which presides over the cathdral. Traditionally pilgrims have been invited to embrace this bust as a sign of veneration and petition. No photographs where allowed and absolute silence was maintained making it a solemn moment. We also descended to the tomb of Saint James where we offered a prayer at his tomb. The hall of glory which contains an image of Saint James on a pillar originally greeted pilgrims who could put their hands into the carvings of the pillar. This is no longer allowed. This was a very moving experience for both of us and we were glad we did it after we had some food and rest.

We ended tonight with dinner at an outdoor cafe near the cathedral. We ate looking forward to two days of enjoying Santiago at a restful pace.


       

 

 

 

  

My Feet Are Raw, My Body Is Weary

Brothers and sisters: Christ will be magnified in my body, whether by life or by death. For to me life is Christ, and death is gain. If I go on living in the flesh, that means fruitful labor for me. And I do not know which I shall choose. I am caught between the two.  I long to depart this life and be with Christ, for that is far better. Yet that I remain in the flesh is more necessary for your benefit. Only, conduct yourselves in a way worthy of the gospel of Christ. ~2 Phil 1:20c-24, 27a

The past two days have been very special to me as I anticipate the completion of the pilgrimage to Santiago to venerate the tomb of the apostle Saint James in order to honor him, because he gave his life for Christ rather than deny the faith. My prayers have focused on the Iraqi Christians and other Christians in the Middle East who are faced with a decision to surrender everything rather than deny the faith.

The road into Portomarin three days ago was very precarious with so many rocks on the path of descent. My feet suffered greatly and I have blisters on the pads of my feet under my toes. Two days ago it so slowed me down so that I began to notice the beauty of the walk. I took a picture of a little mushroom embedded in a tree trunk. A newborn calf, all sorts of flowers… My slow camino these past two days has also made me think about entering Santiago. When I think about it I get very teary-eyed. This is such a privilege to have walked a month in the footsteps of so many faithful Catholics who have made this pilgrimage for over 1000 years.

  

   

 

Camino Day 28, Pedrouzo

Day 28. Monday, September 22, 2014. Pedrouzo.  18K to Santiago.

It is obvious that we have hiked out of summer and into fall. The mornings are cooler and we no longer face the relentless heat under the scorching sun. This morning we could see our breath as we started out. Mist laid in the valleys. The noonday temperatures were comfortable.

There is decidedly a new energy as we near Santiago. The pilgrims seem more relaxed. The thunderstorm couldn’t dampen the spirits of pilgrims at the little tavern last night. This morning there were no pushed departures with people bumping around in the dark of the wee hours of the morning, waking everyone. At the rest stops we call out to the various groups of pilgrims passing by, people who have become familiar to us over these weeks. They greet us as well. There are few strangers at this stage of the journey.

The scenery is beautiful as ever, but we have become familiar with the meadows and hedgerows, the groves of eucalyptus trees with their fragrant aroma, the small stone churches with their double bell towers, the ups and downs of the rutted paths. We were grateful that the rain of last night had passed into a fine morning but the storm had left mud and puddles. At times there was no avoiding muddying our boots.

We stop often along the way, partly to savor the time we time we have left and partly to fill the remaining spaces in our pilgrim’s passports with sellos (stamped seals) they give. Two sellos are required per day in Galicia to attain the Compostela that acknowledges the completion of our pilgrimage.

It was a relatively short and easy hike to Pedrouzo. We arrived before lunch. We didn’t want to press it too much today. We want our last leg of the journey to be enough to challenge us but not enough that we will be exhausted when we arrive.

We talked along the way about how crazy we are to have taken on this journey. What possessed us to spend these four weeks pounding the trail, sleeping in bunk beds in rooms full of people we didn’t know, risking blisters and bug bites and back spasms? It has been a crazy adventure but we have been undeniably blessed.
We wonder how it will be when we see Santiago… first from the Monte de Gozo (Mountain of Joy) where we catch our first glimpse from a distance, then as we join other pilgrims in the final kilometers to the city. There is a pilgrims’ Mass at the cathedral at noon but we are not sure we will make it tomorrow. We look forward to two full days to savor Santiago and to venerate the tomb of St. James.