Tag Archives: chapel

Mass in a Cave Chapel

Monasticism continued to develop into the early medieval period. Basil the Great of Cappadocia was not only an influential theologian but also was known for his care for the poor. He established a monastic rule which set forth a communal monastic way of life focused on prayer and work. His legacy extends into the western church through his influence on Saint Benedict. I would like to share some photos I took of ruins of medieval monastic churches and monasteries in Cappadocia.

Father Mattingly and I were privileged to be able to say Mass in a chapel from the medieval period. Notice the carvings into the rock on the walls of the church.

Photography was forbidden in the churches however please open this folio and be mesmerized by the medieval beauty of the frescoes.

There are more beautiful photographs and descriptions of these churches and frescoes here.

Imperial Castle of Nuremberg

Frauenkirche was a highlight; however in the morning I walked up the hill to the impressive imperial castle which was one of the most impressive and important castles in the middle ages because it stood at the heart of western cultural history.

Once again this cultural site sustained severe bombing. So much is reconstructed except for the chapel built around 1200.

Exterior of Imperial Castle, Nuremberg

The text in the guidebook states: “The Imperial Castle Nuremburg is one of the most important imperial palaces of the Middle Ages. Between 1050 and 1571 it hosted the gatherings of the court, Diets and juridical sessions of all German Emperors and kings of the Holy Roman Empire.
A Salian royal castle was built on the rock here as early as the 11th century. In the 12th and 13th centuries, Emperor Friedrich I. Barbarossa (1123-1190) and his successors built one of the largest and most magnificent castle complexes of the empire on the western rock. The Romanesque double chapel still dates from this time, while the palace and other structures were converted an renewed from 1440 onwards in the Late Gothic style. The mighty bastions were first built one century later.
The Imperial Castle was only inhabited during imperial visits. The emperor’s permanent administrator lived in the Burgrave’s Castle on the eastern rock.”

Madonna in the Imperial Chapel

Madonna in the Imperial Chapel

Imperial Chapel

Imperial Chapel

Crucifix in the Imperial Chapel

Crucifix in the Imperial Chapel

Veronica's Veil in the Imperial Chapel

Veronica’s Veil in the Imperial Chapel

Part of the imperial treasure.

Part of the imperial treasure.

The view from the castle.