Tag Archives: Textbooks

The Death of a Mad Monk

Read about the terrible influence of the monk Rasputin, and his terrible end.

Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points for Peace. “These points were strangely similar to Pope Benedict XV’s Seven Points that, only a few months before, Wilson had said were impractical…” See also the end of the blog post, which link to some YouTube videos, illustrating “the wide difference between the European and American experience of the ‘Great War.'”

Death of the First Romantic, This is a fascinating look at the changing thinking of Friedrich von Schlegel, one of the early Romantics.

These brief insights into historical moments that continue to shape our history, are drawn from the Catholic Textbook Project. They are written so well that they will interest even those who “aren’t interested” in history. They have an interesting Facebook feed as well.

A Moment in History That Shapes Our Future

December 16, 1773: Tea Served in Boston Harbor . In it.

December 1, 1825: Death of a Disillusioned Tsar

November 3-4, 1867: Triumph of the “Vampire of Italy”

These brief insights into historical moments that continue to shape our history, are drawn from the Catholic Textbook Project. They are written so well that they will interest even those who “aren’t interested” in history. They have an interesting Facebook feed as well.

A Moment in History That Shapes Our Future

The First World War Begins

All of Europe protested the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and Duchess Sophie. Who could not sympathize with the aged Emperor Franz Josef, who had suffered so many tragedies in his life and now had to bear with the loss of his heir? Such an outrage demanded justice, and few European leaders would have blamed Austria-Hungary for seeking it.

But, besides the murderer himself and the Black Hand, who was responsible for the archduke’s assassination?

…and…

The Opening Campaign of the Spanish Civil War

The fall of the monarchy gave hope to socialists, anarchists, and other radicals that they could at last take revenge…

These brief insights into historical moments that continue to shape our history, are drawn from the Catholic Textbook Project . This history curriculum will be implemented in the parish school this fall (2014). They are written so well that they will interest even those who “aren’t interested” in history.

Stratford Caldecott, R.I.P.

I commend to your prayers the happy repose of the soul of Professor Stratford Caldecott. In the fall of 2013, I had the honor of spending a day with him in Oxford England and discussing the development of classical education. What a gift and privilege! May he rest in peace. Strat was a man of many accomplishments and his books have had a profound effect on me and my understanding of the relationship of the Catholic faith and education. I commend to your reading the entry from Patheos because it gives you an insight into a man of profound faith.

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/kathyschiffer/2014/07/r-i-p-stratford-caldecott-marvel-of-catholicism/

Please see also:
http://www.zenit.org/en/articles/church-mourns-death-of-leading-catholic-author

http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/news/2014/07/18/leading-catholic-writer-stratford-caldecott-is-mourned/

More about Caldecott’s books:
http://beauty-in-education.blogspot.com/
http://beauty-in-education.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/bibliography.html

May angels lead you into paradise; upon your arrival, may the martyrs receive you and lead you to the holy city of Jerusalem. May the ranks of angels receive you, and with Lazarus, once a poor man, may you have eternal rest.

A Moment in History That Shapes Our Future

We must shoot them all tonight.”

At about midnight of July 16-17, 1918, Nikolai Romanov, the deposed tsar of Russia, and Aleksandra Feodorovna, his wife, were awakened and told to dress quickly…

These brief insights into historical moments that continue to shape our history, are drawn from the Catholic Textbook Project . This history curriculum will be implemented in the parish school this fall (2014). They are written so well that they will interest even those who “aren’t interested” in history.